(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Announcement"

I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/announcennent187475hill 




liilii^ 




TWENTIETH ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



^fu^tee^, Offidef^, ^kdulty, douf^e^ of Iri^tf udtioi] , etd., 



HILLSDALE COLLEGE, 



HILLSDALE, MICHIGAN. 



OCTOBER, 1875. 



TOLEDO, OHIO: 

BLADE PRINTING AND PAPER COMPANY, 
1875. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Term Expires June, 1876 

Rev. Samuel D. Bates, Marion, O. 

Hon. E. O. Grosvenor, Jonesville. 

Rev. Franklin P. Augir, Onarga, 111. 

Rev. Ciiauncy Reynot-ds, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Samuel F. Smith, Postvillo, Iowa. 
Nicholas Vineyard, Hillsdale. 

Hon. Henry Waldron, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1877 

Linus Clark, Green Oak. 

Rev. D. M. Graham, D. D., Hillsdale. 

Col. Frederick Fowler, Reading. 
Barber Perkins, Coldwater. 

Dan M. Harvey, Constantino. 

*Prof. Srencer J. Fowler, Hillsdale. 
Franklin Mead, Homer. 



Term Expires June, 1878. 

Daniel Beebe, Hillsdale. 

Henry J. King, Hillsdale. 

Charles T. Mitchell, Hillsdale. 

Rev. I. Z. Hanning, Rio Grande, Ohio. 
Rev. David L. Rice, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Charles. B. jMills, Vassar. 

James W. Winsor, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1879. 

Rev. George S, Bradley, Wilton, Iowa. 

Rev. D. W. C. Durgin, D. D. , Hillsdale. 
Caleb C. Johnson, M. D., Hillsdale. 
Hon. John P. Cook, Hillsdale. 

Col. Frederick M. Holloway, Jonesville. 
Leonard Olney, Hillsdale. 

Hon. Daniel L. Pratt, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1880. 

Horace Blackmar, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Jamfos B. Drew, Jackson. 

PtEV. Isaac D. Stewart, A. M., Dover, N. H. 
Rev. Ransom Dunn, D. D., Hillsdale. 
Hon. P]zRA L. Koon, Hillsdale. 

Rev. R. L. Howard, Fairport, N.Y. 
Rev. David M. Stuart, Pike, N. Y. 

*Decea.sed, 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



REV. DeWITT C. DURGIN, D. D., Chairman. 

HENRY J. KING, Auditor and General Agent. 

REV. DAVID L. RICE, Endowment and Building Fund Agent. 

LORENZO P. REYNOLDS, Secretary and Treasurer. 



CALENDAR. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

1875. 

Fall Term ends Friday noon, November 19. 

Vacation of one week and four days. 
Winter Terra begins Wednesday, 3 p.m., December 1. 

1876. 

Winter Term ends Friday noon, February 25. 

Vacation of two weeks and four days. 

Spring Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m. , March 15. 

Spring Term ends Thursday, June 15. 

Vacation of ten weeks and four days. 

Fall Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m. , September 6. 

Fall Term ends Friday noon, . ." November 24. 

Vacation of one week and four days. 
Winter Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m., December 6. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Senior Examinations, Friday, May 26. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday, 2 p. m., June 11. 

Class Day, Monday, 10 a. m., June 12. 

Annual Meeting of Trustees, Monday, 2 p.m., June 12. 

Commencement, Thursday, ". June 15. 

Freshman Examinations, Wednesday, 9 a.m., September 6. 

LITERARY SOCIETY ANNIVERSARIES. 

Theological Society, Tuesday Evening, June 6. 

Ladies' Literary Union, Wednesday Evening, June 7. 

Amphictyon Society, Thursday Evening, June 8. 

Germanae Sodales, Friday Evening, June 9. 

Alpha Kappa Phi, Saturday Evening, .June 10. 

CONCERT. 

Beethoven Society, Wednesday Evening, June 14. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Rev. DeWITT C. DURGIN, D. D., PresidexNT, 
and professor of mental and moral philosophy. 



Rev. ransom DUNN, D. D., 

BURR PROFESSOR OF SYSTEMATIC AND PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 



*Rev. spencer J. FOWLER, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS. 



DANIEL M. FISK, B. P., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY, 



Rev. JOHN J. BUTLER, D. D., 

PROFESSOR OF SACRED LITERATURE. 



Rev. JOHN S. COPP, A. M. 

ALUMNI PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC AND BELLES-LETTRES. 



GEORGE H. RICKER, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF THE GREEK AND LATIN LANGUAGES. 



Rev. RICHARD S. JAMES, D. D., 

MARKS PROFESSOR OF HOMILETICS. 



Miss MARY B. PHILLIPS, A. M., 

PRINCIPAL OF THE LADIES' DEPARTMENT, AND INSTRUCTOR IN 
HISTORY AND FRENCIL 



Rev. WJLLLXM H. liOWEN, D. D., 

LECTURER ON SACRKl^ RHETORIC. 



♦Deceased. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



JOHN H. BUTLER, A. B., 

INSTRUCTOB IN LATIN. 



ARTHUR E. HAYNES, B. S., 

INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS. 



ALEXANDER C RIDEOUT, 

PRINCIPAL OF COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT, AND PROFESSOR OF 
COMMERCIAL LAW. 



WARREN A. DRAKE, 

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL OP COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT, AND INSTRUCTOR. 
IN COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC AND PENMANSHIP. 



Hon. DANIEL L. PRATT, 

(judge of the CIRCUIT COURT.) 
LECTURER ON REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



JUDSON B. PALMER, 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR IN TELECxRAPHY. 



GEORGE B. GARDNER, 

INSTRUCTOR IN PAINTING AND DRAWING. 



MELVILLE W. CHASE, 

INSTRUCTOR IN TNSTRUMENTAT> AND YOCAI> MUSIC. 



ORPHEUS E. DAVIS, B. S., 

INSTRUCTOR IN PRACTICAL TELEGRAPHY. 



BESSIE B. RIDEOUT, 

TEACHER IN ELEMENTARY TELEGRAPHY. 



SUMMARY OF ATTEN'DANCE. 



Graduates, Classical 8 

" Scientific 21 

" Theological 2 

— 31 

Seniors, Classical 11 

Scientific 11 



Juniors, Ciassiral.. 
" Scientific. 



SoPEOJiOREs, Clae-ical 13 

" Scientific 17 

Freshmen, Classical 9 

" Sdentiiic 29 



22 



30 



3S 



Set ected Studies 7 

Senior Preparatory, Classical 20 

MrDDLE Preparatory, Classical 21 

Junior Preparatory 57 

English Preparatory 2C3 

Theological Department — 

Senior Class 3 

Middle Cla?8 4 

Junior Class 4 

Preparatory Class 13 

— 24 
Commercial Department 70 

In other Departments 129 

— 199 
Music Department— 

InstriimcJital 50 

Vocal 48 

— 98 
Art Department— 

Painting— Oil 11 

Drawing and Perspective, Gentlemen 56 

" " Ladies 44 

— Ill 

Total in all Departments 864 

Deduct those counted in tw j Departments ,277 

Makinij a total actual attendance of 586 



HILLSDALE COLLEGE. 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



\rJpHE regular examination for admission to the Freshman Class will 
^j begin at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, September (Uh, 1876, at which all 
candidates for matriculation must be present. 

The examinations will be written and oral, and will commence at the 
President's room, (jSTo. 9.) 

Candidates for matriculation must be at least fourteen years of age, 
and must present testimonials of good character, and those from other 
institutions must bring certificates of class standing and honorable 
dismission. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are admitted to the 
Freshman Class on satisfactory examination in 

LATIN. 

1. Latin Grammar, including Prosody; 

2. Latin Prose Composition; 

3. CaBsar, five books; 

4. Cicero, six orations; 

5. Virgil, six books. 

GREEK. 

\. Greek Grammar and Lessons; 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis, three books; 

3. Greek Prose Composition. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Arithmetic, completed; 

2. Algebra, as far as Ratio and Proportion : 

3. English Grammar and Analysis: 

4. Geography, Ancient, Modern and Pliysical; 

5. Composition and Rhetoric; 

6. Plane Geometry; 

7. Ancient History; 

8. After this year, one year of either French or German. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science are admitted to 
the Freshman Class on satisfactory examination in 

LATIN. 

1. Latin Grammar; 

2. Latin Reader; 

3. Ctesar, five books. 

4. Cicero, three orations. 



10 GO UBSE OF INSTR UGTION. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

/ Intellectual Philosophy — Pm-ter; 
Fall Term.... ■< Evidences in Christianity — Hopkins; 

( History, Mediaeval and Modern — Swinton; 

[Butler's Analogy — {One half the term;) 
Winter Term ' ^sthetics-(0;2.-7ia(f term;) 

I English Literature — Shaw; 

(^History of Civilization — Guizot. 

{ Moral Philosophy — Hopkins; 
Spring Term, -j Political Economy — Perry; 

( History, Development of U. S. Constitution. 

Declamations, original essays, speeches, etc., each term of the 
course ; as shov^n in the Scheme of Rhetorical Exercises. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I Cicero — Ghase and Stuart; 
Fall Term.... \ Inorganic Chemistry — Barker; 
( French Grammar — Ploetz. 

I Virgil — Ghase and Stuart; 
Winter Term \ Mineralogy — Lectures; 

i French, Napoleon and La Petit Robinson de Paris. 

{ Virgil — Ghase and Stuart; 
Spring Term. -] Organic Chemistry — Lectures; 

( French, Racine — Fasquelle. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

I De Senectute — Ghase and Stuart; 
Fall Term.... •] Advanced Algebra — Loomis; 

' German Grammar — Otto. 

( Livy — Ghase and Stuart; 
Winter Term -j Geometry and Conic Sections — Loomis; 

i German Reader — Evans' Otto. 

( Horace — Ghase and Stuart; 
Spring Tkrm. -] Trigonometry, Mensuration, Surveying — Loomis; 

( German, Faust. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

{ Logic — Jfivons; 
Fall Tkrm.... -| ,\I(!chanics — Olmsted; 

( Anatomy, Human and CJomparative — Lectures. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCriON. 



11 



Winter Tekm 



f Rhetoric — Day; 

! Na 



atural Philosophy — Olmsted; 
I Physiology — Lectures; 
[ Analytical Geometry and Calculus- 



-Loomis; {optional. ) 



{ Piiilology — Whitney; 
Spring r^^^,y,}^^^^^onomy-Olmsted; 
I Geology — Uana; 
t Botany — Qray. 



Fall Term. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Intellectual Philosophy — Porter; 
Evidences of Christianity — Hopkins; 
Mediaeval and Modern History — Swinton. 



I Butler's Analogy and Esthetics ; 
Winter Term -j English Literature— ra2:«6V 

( History of Civilization — Guizot. 



Spring Term. 



Moral Philosoph}^ — Hopkins; 

Political Economy — Perry; 

History, Development of the U. S. Constitution. 



Themes, declamations, etc., the same as in the classical course. 

Instruction is given in the above studies only at the time specified, 
and students are required to observe this order without omission or trans- 
position. 



EXAMINATIONS. 



Examinations for regular promotion are required on the completion 
of every study; and the pursuance of a study during the lohole or apart 
of a term will in no case entitle the strident to class promotion without his 
having passed a satisfactory examination therein. 




COLLEGE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



OHi-A-SSIO J^Xj. 



JUNIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

f Latin Grammar — Harkness; 
Fall Term.... < Composition and Rhetoric — JIart; 
i Physical Geography— Ilotiston; 

( Latin Reader — Rarkness; 
Winter Term •] Elementary Philosophy — Quackenhos, 
( Ancient History — Sidnton.. 

c Latin Reader — llarkness; 
Spring Term. \ Arithmetic, completed — Robinson; 
( English Grammar — Siointon. 

MIDDLE PREPARATORY YEAR. 

iCsesar — Chase and Stuart; 
Greek Grammar — Crosby; 
French, German or Algebra. 

( Caesar — Chase and titewa^rt; 
Winter Term \ Greek Lessons — Crosby; 

French, German or Algebra. 

Cicero — Chase and 8tua,rt; 
Spring Term. ■{ Anabasis — Crosby; 

French, German or Geometry. 

SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

{ Cicero — Chase and Stuart; 
Fall Term.... < Anabasis — Crosby; 

\ Elementary Algebra — Loomis. 

5 Virgil — Chase and Stuart; 
Anabasis — Crosby; 
Higher Algebi-a (begun) — Loomis. 

[ Virgil — (JJiasfi and StuaH; 
Spring Term. \ Greek Prose Composition; 
' Plane Geometry — Loomis. 



\ 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 13 



SOIEISTTIIFIO. 



JUNIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

I Latin Grammar — Hm-kness; 
P'alt. Term. ...\ Physical Geography — Houston; 
i English Grammar — Swinton. 

{ Latin Reader — Harkness; 
Winter Ter.ae I Ancient History — Siointon. 
( Arithmetic — Robinson. 

I [.latin Reader — Ilarkness; 
SpRiN(3i Term, -j English Grammar — Swinton; 
( Arit hmet ic — Rohinso n; 

SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

( Caesar — Clmse and Stuart; 
Fall Term.... •< Composition and Rhetoric — Hart; 
( First Algebra — Ijoomis; 

i Caesar — Chase and Stuart; 
Elementary Philosophy — Quaclcemhos. 
. Second Algebra — Loomis. 

I Cicero — Chase and Stuart; 
Spring Term. -| Botany — Cray; 

( Geometry — Loomis. 

Rhetorical exercises as in Classical Course. 



ENGLISH STUDIES. 

Classes are formed eacJi terra in Arithmetic, Algebra and English 
Grammar. 

English preparatory Students will meet on Wednesday of the fourth, 
sixth, eighth and tenth weeks for elocutionary exercises. 

Rhetorical Exercises through the whole course, as shown in Rhet- 
orical scheme. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 


COURSE OF STUDY. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 


Peofessok Butler : 


Critical and Exegetical study of 


New Testament Grammar; 
Critical and Exegetical study of 


select portions of the Old 
Testament Scriptures. 


portions of the Gospels/ the 


ENGLISH COURSE: 


Acts and Epistles; 


Elementary Logic and Rhetoric; 


Translations of select passages 


Mental and Moral Philosophy; 


by the Class, and essays on va- 


Butler's Analogy; 


rious topics in Sacred Chron- 


Natural Sciences; 


ology, Geographj'- and Historj^ ; 


English Literature. 


Hebrew Grammar; 




MIDDLE YEAE. 


Professor Dunn : Justification by Faith ; 


Lectures on the Evidences of 


Sauctification. 


Christianity and Systematic 


Professor Butler : 


Theology; 


Bible Criticism and Interpre- 


Existence and Attributes of God ; 


tation; 


Authenticity and Inspiration of 


Canon of the Old and New 


the Bible ; 


Testament; 


Works and Government of God; 


Exegesis of select portions; 


Nature and Fall of Man ; 


Whately's Logic and Rhetoric, 


Moral Agency ; 


with Criticism of Written Ex- 


The Atonement : 


ercises and Themes; Lectures 


Repentance; 


on the Laws of Thought, 


Regeneration; 1 Habits of Study and StyleT 


SENIOR YEAR. 


Professor Dunn: 


Profesisor Copr: 


Systematic Theology, continued ; 


Ecclesiastical History; 


Perseverance; 


History of the Ancient, Medi- 


The Kesurrection; 


aeval, and Modern Church, in- 


Final Judgment; 


cluding doctrines,- controver- 


Future State of Rewards and 


. sies, and laws of the Church. 


Punishments; 




The Sabbath; 


Professor James : 


Prayer; 


Homiletics; 


Tlie Ministry ; 


Analysis of the sermon and dis- 


Christian Ordinances; 


cussion of the principal parts; 


Pastoral Theology; 


Written Sermons from each 


Work of \.\n; (JhrisLian Minister 


member of the Class; 


in tlie Pulpit, I^rHyer-meeting, 


Criticism of the same by the 


Sabbath School, Revivals, 


Prof(;ssor. 


Missions, etc. 





THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 15 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

This Department is open to ^nj person of Christian character, who 
wishes to take a theological course of study, and whose education 
qualifies ium to pursue the course with profit. » 

Candidates for admission are expected to be present on the first day 
of the Academic Year. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition is free to all in this department who are members in good 
standing in any evangelical denomination, and tuition is free to those in 
other departments of the College who are preparing for the work of the 
gospel ministry. 

AID. 

Pecuniary assistance is furnished to students who are preparing for 
the ministry and are needy, and, so far as practicable, opportunities for 
renmnerative preaching are obtained for them. The means thus pro- 
vided, together with what may be earned during the vacations, are 
usually sufiicient to support the student through the year. 

LIBRARY. 

The C'ollege has a well selected library to which additions are fre- 
quently made. This is accessible to the students in theology, free of 
charge. The Theological department has also a valuable library 
especially adapted to its wants, and with a fund for its constant increase. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

This course embraces all the studies of the regular course, except 
the Ancient Languages. A special course is allowed, under the direction 
of the Faculty, to those whose circumstances preclude them from the 
other courses. 

GRADUATION. 

A Diploma is given to those who complete either prescribed course 
of theological study and pass satisfactory examinations in the same. 
The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred on those who complete 
the regular course. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

These, in the Theological Department are the same as those in the 
College. See Calendar. 



eOMMERCIAL & TELEGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

This Department is provided with exce]lent facilities for pursuing 

Commercial, Telegraphic, and Penmanship Courses. 

« 

PREPARATION. 

A fair knowledge of the common English Branches is required to 
enter either the Commercial or Telegraphic Course. 

TIME TO ENTER. 

Students can enter this Department at any time. 
LENGTH OF TIME REQUIRED. 

The Commercial Course can, in some cases, be completed in three 
months, but most students should spend from four to five months in 
study and practice. The Telegraphic Course requires from five to eight 
months. 

DIPLOMAS 
Are awarded to graduates. 

VACATION. 

There will be a vacation during the summer months corresponding 
to that of the College proper, but classes in this Department wull not 
be interrupted by the short vacations between terms. 

TUITION, 

Payable in advance, at the Ofiice of the Department, by purchase of 
Scholarsliips or Admission Cards. 

Scholarship for Commercial Course, giving the holder the privilege of complet- 
ing the Course at pleasure, and reviewing without charge, including Business 

Penmanship, no extra fees, $30 00 

Telegraphic Course. Theoretical and practical, (paper) 25 00 

Telegraphic Course, Theoretical and Practical, (souna) 35 00 

Joint Commercial and Telegraphic (Scholarship, (paper) 45 00 

Joint Commercial and Telegraphic Scholarship, (sound) 55 00 

Ladies admitted for the Commercial Course, 25 00 

Ladie3 admitted for the Telegraphic Course, (paper) 20 00 

Ladies adinitte.l for the Telegraphic Course, (sound) 30 Ou 

To Telegraphic htudents, Business PenmauHliip during the entire course— ot.e 

hour per day, (extra) H 00 

Telegraphic Book keeping, (extra) 5 00 

Botl) combined, (extra) .10 00 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPIIIC. 17 



PENMANSHIP. 

Twenty Lessons, one hour each, $2 00 

Forty Lessons, one hour each, 3 50 

Sixty Lessons (tweve weeks' one totir each, 5 00 

One Month, constant practice, 6 CO 

Two Months, constant practice. .^ 10 00 

Teachers" Course in Praciical (time unlimited), 15 00 

Course in Ornamental, 20 00 

Both Practical and Ornamental 30 00 

Commercial Course and Teiicher^' Course in Practical Penmanship, both Scholar- 
ships for unlimited time, 40 00 

Scholarships are not translerable. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

For the Commercial Course, from $12 to $15. Telegraphic Course, 
from $2 to $2 50. 

All amounts received for Scholarships from residents of Hillsdale 
County will be devoted to the new building to be occupied by this 
department. Those who attend the department now, will not only pay 
for tuition, but for a fine public building, at the same time, with the 
same money that would pay for tuition alone, elsewiiere. 

Persons not wishing to pursue a course of study in the department 
at present, but who intend to do so in a few years, would do well to 
purchase scholarships nov) and thus aid in the construction of the beau- 
tiful group of buildings in process of erection. 

THE COMMERCIAL COURSE, 

EMBRACES COMMERCIAL LAW, POLITICAL ECONOMY, BOOK-KEEPING, 
PENMANSHIP, AND COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC. 



Book-keeping, as studied in connection with the course, exhibits the 
entire process of opening, conducting and closing about forty sets of 
Stock and Partnership Books, with the most approved forms for keep, 
ing accounts by Single and Double Entry, in the various departments 
of trade. 

In working these sets the student makes out his Journal, — in most 
of the sets Day-book also, and posts to his Ledger, keeping all the 
auxiliary books, and writing out every kind of Commercial Paper, 
including Contracts, Promissory Notes, Checks, Drafts, Bills of Ex- 
change, Orders, Receipts, Due-bills, Accounts Current, Account Sales, 
Bills of Parcels, Invoices, and Bills of Lading. 

Among the kinds of business which the practice in Book-keeping 
comprises, are Wholesale and Retail Merchandising, Commission, Com- 
pound Company and Joint Stock business, Banking, Steamboating, 
Railroading, Manufacturing, Jobbing, Brokerage ,and Exchange. 

Instruction is given orally to classes and to individuals separately, 
and their work criticised and corrected. 

The Course is divided into three divisions, as follows: 



18 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPHIC 



FIRST DIVISION. 



Day-book ; 
Journal; 
Ledger ; 
Trial Balance; 
Analysis; 



Commercial Paper; 

Commercial Arithmetic- Crittenden 

Penmnusliip; 

Commercial Law — Parsons; 

Political Economy — Perry. 



SECOND DIVISION. 



Full Journal; I 

Cash Book; | 

Special Column Journal; j 

Commission Sales Book; I 

Executors' and Administrators' | 

Accounts; 
Changing Sets of Stock Books from 

Single to Double Entry ; 
Changing Sets of Partnership Books 

from Single to Double Entry; 



Changing Sets of Stock and Part* 
nership Books from Double to 
Single Entry ; 

Shipments; ^ 

Commercial Paper; 

Consignments; 

Correspondence ; 

Commercial Law; 

Political Economy; 

Commercial Arithmetic; 

Penmanship. 



THIRD DIVISION, 



Compound Company 

Half System; 
Compound Company 

Whole System; 
Railroading; 
Stcamboating; 
Banking ; 



Accounts, 



Accounts, 



Brokerage ; 
Life Insurance; 
Fire Insurance; 
Penmanship ; 
Commercial Arithmetic : 
Political Economy; 
Commercial Law. 



TELEGRAPHY. 



Theoretical and Practical Telegraphy is taught by the Principal — a 
sound operatoi- of years' experience, aided by practical assistants. 

FACILITIES. 

The telegraphic apparatus is very largo, embracing every kind of 
instrument in use on the lines of this country, in connection with which 
there is a good collection of electrical instruments quite sufficient to 
fully illustrate every principle of electricity which would in any wise 
interest or benefit the student of Telegraphy. In the practice, students 
are drilled first on short circuits confined to the College building, then 
upon the College line having five separate offices, distant from each 
other a quarter of a mile, and provided with all necessary ofiice supplies, 
such us blank record books, printed message blanks, tariff books, blank 
reports, and train order blanks. The W. U. (!o.'s city office and the 
telegraph offic(i of the L. S. & M. S. M. R. are also coruiected with this 
line, urirj the; telegrams of tlie ])ul)lic are recciivcid and trunsmittcid from 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPHIC. 10 



either of these offices. As soon as the student becomes qualified to 
transact business for the public readily, he is allowed to take charge of 
the city oflice of the W. U. Telegraph Co. , where he is required to per- 
form every duty connected with the public service, working directly 
with several cities anc^ large towns, and being brought through this 
channel into business relations with a large body of operators, among 
whom are some of the best qualified in the service, he is enabled to gain 
a practical experience not attainable in any other way. 

THE COURSE 

Is divided into two divisions, and is accompanied by a course of 
Lec^ires embracing the following subjects: 

Frictional Electricity, Galvanic or Voltaic Electricity, Magnetism, 
Systems of Telegraphy, Thermal Electricity, Insulation, Circuits, Con- 
duction, Induction, ^rial Telegrapli, Submarine Telegraph, Terrestrial 
Electrical Disturbances. 

FIRST DIVISION. 



Instruments; 
Writing (Telegraphic); 
Receiving; 

Outline of Theoretical Telegraphy 
—Pond; 



Elementary Chemistry — Wells; 

Messag(!S ; 

Checking; 

Penmanship. 



SECOND DIVISION. 

Transmitting; I History and Theory of Telegraph — 

Receiving; | Prescott; 

Book-keeping (Telegraphic); Railroad Business; 

I Penmanship. 

The Department will soon have completed a subscription of ten 
thousand dollars for the construction of the north-west building, as 
shown in the plan of the new College group. When completed, this 
building will be a more elegant and commodious home than is possessed 
by any similar school in the West. The friends of commercial educa- 
tion are earnestly solicited to aid in this first structure of the kind in the 
United States, built by the business public. 

For additional information concerning this Department, address 

ALEXANDER C. RIDEOUT, PHndpal. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



TUITION — PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

For Piano, Organ, Harmony, or Voice Building, (Dr. Streeter's System :)— 

Ten Weeks', twenty lessons $12 00 

Ten Weeks, ten lessons.. . 6 50 

For Elementary or Advanced Singincj Class, Five Weeks, twenty lessons * 1 00 

INFORMATION. 

A fine suite of rooms, in the building now erecting, will be devoted 
to the use of this department. 

In the Instrumental Department, it is the chief aim to lay a sure 
foundation, by a patient study of technics, and to develop a pure taste. 

Classes in vocal music will be graded to give thorough instruction 
in the principles of notation, and to afford means for acquiring consid- 
erable ability in reading at sight. 

The Beethoven Society affords opportunity for advanced singers 
to become familiar with the various styles of choir and chorus singing, 
and for an acquaintance with many compositions of the best masters. 



ART DEPARTMENT, 



During the past year " Free Hand Drawing and Perspective " have 
been taught and made a requirement to students entering the Freshman 
Class. In the East Building, now being erected, a suite of fine rooms 
is set apart for this Department. These rooms are located and lighted 
with a view to their especial use. A nucleus of original paintings is 
already in existence by the liberality of friends. A supply of casts is 
very much needed and it is hoped will soon be added. 

Art-study from nature and original works is largely pursued, and 
it is the aim to make this Department second to none in this country. 

An endr)wment for this Department is much needed and it is hoped 
that the especial friends of Art will come forward and supply this 
want. If compel ent instructors are retained it is necessary that this 
brancli of the Institution shall be self-sustaining. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 

S^ILLSDALE, the seat of Hillsdale College is a flourishing city in 
■==^ Southern Michigan, By means of the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Detroit, Hillsdale & Southwestern Railroads, which 
pass through it, communication is had with all parts of the country. 
By these routes it is one hundred and eighty miles east of Chicago, sixty 
w^est of Toledo, and eighty southwest of Detroit. The College buildings, 
located on College Hill, beautifully overlook the entire business portion 
of the city, and yet are sufficiently removed to secure quiet. 

BUILDINGS. 

Tiie College occupies four separate buildings, three of them new, 
having been erected since the burning of the former edifice, March 6th, 
1874. The structures are all of brick, three stories high, and are 
arranged on three sides of a quadrangle, the principal front facing the 
south. The College park of twenty-live acres, is well laid out and 
beautifully adorned with shade trees and evergreens. 

The main College Hall, 80 x 80, contains the C:*hapel, 60 x 6i^, 
Library and Reading Room, 60 x 30, President's Room, Treasurer's 
Office, four classical, and two mathematical recitation rooms. The 
building is of Composite st3^1e of architecture, and is surmounted by a 
dome containing a 2,500 lb. bell, and a large four dial tower clock. The 
turret deck above the dome, (accessible to visitors,) rises 125 feet over 
the foundation, and commands the finest view in Southern Michigan. 

The extreme West Building, 48 x 72, contains the Museum of Nat- 
ural History, 48x80 — two stories; the Chemistry Amphitheatre; two 
fire-proof Chemical Laboratories; the Alumni Hall; and three large and 
elegantly furnished Literary Society Halls. 

The extreme East Building, 48 x 72, contains the Philosophical 
Amphitheatre; the Lady Principal's Recitation Room; one Matliematical 
Recitation Room; Art Gallery; Studio; Music Room; Beethoven Hall ; 
and two Ladies' Society Halls. 

The Ladies' Dormitory Building, 80 x 60, is the "East Hall and 
Connection" of the former building, (the centre and west wing of which 
were burned.) It contains the College Parlor; Lady Principal's Office 
and Rooms; Dormitories for fifty young ladies; the Dining Hall, 
Kitchen, etc. 

The North West Building, 50 x 72 feet, which is to be built the 
present year, will contain the Recitation Rooms and offices of the Com- 



24 GENEBAL INFORMATION. 



The Department has also added a series of one liundied colored 
anatomical charts, and also a suit of ten geological paintings illustrative 
of the difl'erent geological ages, painted for the College by Pi of. Geo. B. 
Gardner, which are of the highest artistic and scientific value. A new 
and "powerful micioscope, made by Browning, of London, has been 
presented to the department the present year. 

The department of Chemistry, though it lost all by the fire, is now 
more fully equipped in chemicals and apparatus, and possesses more 
varied and convenient appliances for its work than before the fire. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Gentlemen have three w^ell sustained Literary Societies: The 
Amphictyon, the Alpha Kappa Phi, and the Theological. 

The latter is mostly composed of students who have the ministry in 
view. 

The Ladies have tw^o Societies: The Ladies' Literary Union, and 
the Germanae Sodales, which are also w^ell sustained. 

These Societies have separate rooms. 

ALUMNI CATALOGUE. 

The Alumni Association publish this year a complete list of their 
membership, which includes all who have graduated from the College, 
giving their degrees, place of nativity, present address, occupation, etc. 
This Catalogue will be equivalent to the " College Triennial," and con- 
tain the Constitution of the Association, an abstract of the proceedings 
since its organization, the necrology of members, an account of the 
Literary Exercises of their Reunion, etc. 

This initiatory volume has been compiled by Elon G. Reynolds, A.M., 
a resident graduate, and is the result of a careful and patient gathering 
of such facts as will be of peculiar interest to all the members of the 
Association, and of great value to the College. 

Extra copies may be obtained upon application to the Alumni 
Professor, Rev. John S. Copp. Single copies, 25 cents, five copies, sf'l. 



OUR CATALOGUE, 



Because of the reduction of our resources since the destructive 
fire of 1874, and because of increased expenses, we have found it 
diflTicult to issue our Annual Catalogue. We have, therefore, issued 
ji smaller edition and supplemented with this circular to save expense 
both in publishing and in postage. In ordering the Catalogue cost and 
postage will be acceptable. 









iW '■' 



^S^»v^t^:. -^ ^ ^' 



/<JSx 








^■^ 




^<^:^ 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



^fu^tee^, Offidef^, 5^kdulty, Couf^e^ of Iij^tf udtioi\ , etd., 



HILLSDALE COLLEGE, 



HILLSDALE, MICHIGAN. 



OCTOBER, 1875. 



TOLEDO, OHIO: 

BLADE PRINTING AND PAPER COMPANY, 
1875. 



Mflf?VARO eOLLEG 



OCT- T. ^932 



BDARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Term Expires June, 1876 

Rev. Samuel D. Bates, Marion, 0. 

Hon, E. O. Grosvenoii, Jonesville. 

Rev. Franklin P. Augir, Onarga, 111. 

Rev. Cuauncy Reynolds, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Samuel F. Smith, PostviJle, Iowa. 
Nicholas Vineyard, HilJsdale. 

Hon. Henry Waldron, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1877 

LiNys Clark, Green Oak. 

Rev. D. M. Graham, D. D., Hillsdale. 

Col. Frederick Fowler, Reading. 
Barber Perkins, Coldwaler. 

Dan M. Harvey, Constantine. 

*Prof. Spencer J. Fowler, Hillsdale. 
Franklin Mead, Homer. 



Term Expires June, 



Daniel Beebe, Hillsdale. 

Henry J. King, Hillsdale. 



Charles T. Mitchell, Hillsdale. 

Rev. I. Z. Hanning, Rio Grande, Ohio. 
Rev. David L. Rice, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Charles. B. Mills, Vassar. 
James W. Winsor, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1879. 

Rev. George S. Bradley, Wilton, Iowa. 

Rev. D. W. C. Durgin, D. D., Hillsdale. 
Caleb 0. Johnson, M. D., Hillsdale. 
Hon. John P. Cook, Hillsdale. 

CoL. Frederick M. Holloway, Jonesville. 
Leonard Olney, Hillsdale. 

Hon. Daniel L. Pratt, Hillsdale. 



Term Expires June, 1880. 

Horace Blackmar, Hillsdale. 

Rev. James B. Drew, Jackson. 

Rev. Isaac D. Stewart, A. M., Dover, N. II. 
Rev. Ransom Dunn, D. D., Hillsdale. 
Hon. Ezra L. Koon, Hillsdale. 

Rkv. ]{. L. Howaijd, Fairport, N.Y. 
Rev. David M. Stuart, Pike, N. 

♦Deceased. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



REV. DeWITT C. DURGIN, D. D., Chairman. 

HENRY J. KING, Auditor and General Agent. 

REV. DAVID L. RICE, Endowment and Building Fund Agent. 

LORENZO P. REYNOLDS, Secretary and Treasurer. 



CALENDAR. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

1875- 

Fall Term ends Friday noon, November 19. 

Vacation of one week and four days. 
Winter Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m., December 1. 

1876. 

Winter Term ends Friday noon, February 25. 

Vacation of two weeks and four days. 

Spring Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m. , March 15. 

Spring Term ends Thursday, June 15. 

Vacation of ten weelvs and four days. 

Fall Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m. , September 6. 

Fall Term ends Friday noon, November 24. 

Vacation of one week and four days. 
Winter Term begins Wednesday, 3 p.m., December 6. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Senior Examinations, Friday, May 26. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday, 2 p. m., June 11. 

Class Day, Monday, 10 a. m., June 12. 

Annual Meeting of Trustees, Monday, 2 p.m., June 12. 

Commencement, Thursday, June 15. 

Freshman Examinations, Wednesday, 9 a.m., . .September 6. 

LITERARY SOCIETY ANNIVERSARIES. 

Theological Society, Tuesday Evening, June 6. 

Ladies' Literary Union, Wednesday Evening, June 7. 

Amphictyon Society, Thursday Evening, . June 8. 

Germanae Sodales, Friday Evening, June 9. 

Alpha Kappa Phi, Saturday Evening, June 10. 

CONCERT. 

Beethoven Society, Wednesday Evening, • June 14. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Rev. DeWITT C. DURGIN, D. D., President 
and professor of mental and moral philosophy. 



Rev. ransom DUNN, D. D., 

BURR PROFESSOR OF SYSTEMATIC AND PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 



*Rev. spencer J. FOWLER, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS. 



DANIEL M. FISK, B. P., 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 



Rev. JOHN J. BUTLER, D. D., 

PROFESSOR OF SACRED LITERATURE. 



Rev. JOHN S. COPP, A. M. 

ALUMNI PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC AND BELLES-LETTRES. 



GEORGE H. RICKER, A. M., 

J'ROFESSOR OF THE GREEK AND LATIN LANGUAGES. 



Rev. RICHARD S. JAMES, D. D., 

MARKS PROFESSOR OF lIOMIIiP^TICS. 



Miss MARY B. PHILLIPS, A. M., 

PHINCrPAL OK TIIK LADIES' DEPARTMENT, AND INSTRUCTOR IN 



HISTORY AND FRENCH. 



Rev. Wn.LLXM H. BOWEN, D. D., 

LKCTURKli ON SACRED RIFETORFC. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



JOHN H. BUTLER, A. B., 

INSTRUCTOK IN LATIN. 



ARTHUR E. HAYNES, B. S., 

INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS. 



ALEXANDER C RIDEOUT, 

I'KrNCIPAL OF COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT, AND PROFESSOR OF 
COMMERCIAL LAW. 



WARREN A. DRAKE, 

ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL OF COMMERCIAL DEPARTME:NT, AND INSTRUCTOR. 
IN COMIMERCIAL ARITHMETIC AND PENMANSHIP. 



Hon. DANIEL L. PRATT, 

(JUDOE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT.) 
LECTURER ON REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



JUDSON B. PALMER, 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR IN TELEGRAPHY. 



CxEORGE B. GARDNER, 

INSTRUCTOR IN PAINTING AND DRAWING 



MELVILLE W. CHASE, 

INSTRUCTOR IN INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL MUSIC. 



ORPHEUS E. DAVIS, B. S., 

INSTRUCTOR IN PRACTICAL TEI,f:GRAPHY. 



BESSIE B. RIDEOUT, 

TEACHER IN ELEMENTARY TELEGRAPHY. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE, 



S75. 



Graduates, Classical 8 

" Scientific 21 

" Thieological 2 

Senioes, Classical 11 

" Scientific 11 



22 



Juniors, Classical 8 

" Scientific 6 

— 14 
Sophomores, ClaS'-ical 13 

" Scientific 17 

— 30 
Freshmen, Classical 9 

Scientific 29 

— 3S 

Selected Studies 7 

Senior Preparatory, Classical 20 

Middle Preparatory, Classical 21 

Junior Preparatory 57 

English Preparatc ry 203 

Theological Department— 

Senior Class 3 

Middle Class 4 

Junior Class 4 

Preparatory Class 13 

— 24 
Commercial Department 70 

In OTHER Departments 129 

— 199 
Music Department— 

Instrumental 50 

Vocal 48 ■ 

— 98 
Art Department— 

Painting— Oil 11 

Drawing and Perspective, Gentlemen 56 

" " Ladies 44 

— Ill 

Total in aU Departments 864 

Deduct those counted in two Departments — 277 

Making a total actual attendance of 586 



HILLSDALE COLLEGE. 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



5jjrHE regular examination for admission to the Freshman Class will 
^ begin at A.M. on Wednesday, September Gth, 1876, at which all 
candidates for matriculation must be present. 

The examinations will be written and oral, and will commence at the 
President's room, (No. 9.) 

Candidates for matriculation must be at least fourteen years of age, 
and must present testimonials of good character, and those from other 
institutions must bring certificates of class standing and honorable 
dismission. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are admitted to the 
Fresliman Class on satisfactory examination in 

LATIN. 

1. Latin Grammar, including Prosod}^; 

2. Latin Prose Composition; 
8. (/i«sar, five books; 

4. Cicero, six orations; 

■ 5. Virgil, six books. 

GREEK. 

1. Greek Grammar and Lessons; 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis, three books; 

3. Greek Prose Composition. 

ENGLISH. 

1. Arithmetic, completed; 

2. Algebra, as far as Ratio and Proportion : 

3. English Graramar and Anal3^sis; 

4. Geography, Ancient, Modern and Physical; 

5. Composition and Rhetoric; 
(5. Plane Geometry; 

7. Ancient Plistory; 

8. After this year, one year of either French or German. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science are admitted to 
the Freshman Class on satisfactory examination in 

LATIN. 

1. Latin Grammar; 

2. Latin Reader; 

3. CsBsar, five books. 

4. Cicero, three orations. 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



ENGLISH. 

1. Aritlimetic, completed; 

2. Algebra, as far as Ratio and Propoition ; 

3. English Grammar and Analysis; 

4. Composition and Rhetoric; 

5. Elementary Philosophy; 

6. Geography, Physical and Political; 

7. Plane Geometry. 

8. Ancient History. 

The importance and necessity of the most thorough preparation in 
the above studies is here clearly stated, as the College publishes no 
requirements for admission that will not be rigidly exacted on entrance 
and announces no course of studies thereafter that is not fully carried 
out. 

Candidates for admission to advanced standing, whether from another 
College or not, will pass examinations. 

1. In all the studies required for admission to the Freshman Class. 

2. In all the required studies already gone over by the class for 
which they present themselves. 




COURSE OF INSTRUCTION, 



CLASSICAL. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



iDe Amicitia et De Senectute — Chase and Stuart. 
Herodotus — Matlier — Greek Prose Composition. 
. Advanced Algebra — Loomis. 

/ Livy — Chase and Stuart. 
Winter Term •< Plomer's Iliad — Boise; 

( Geometry and Conic Sections — Loomis. 

I Horace — Chase and Stuart; 
Spring Term. \ Memorabilia — Bobbins; 

\ Trigonometry, Mensuration, Surveying — Loomis. 

SOPHOMORE year. 

( Antigone — Woolsey; 
Fall Term.... \ Mechanics — Olmsted; 

( Inorganic Chemistry — Barker. 

I Tacitus — Tyler; 
Winter Term -^ Physics — Olmsted; 

\ Mineral Chemistry — Lectures. 

[ Thucydides or Demosthenes; 

Spring Term. ^ Astronomy — SnelVs Olmsted; 

( Organic Chemistry — Lectures. 

JUNIOR year 

( Tusculan Disputations — Cha^e; 
Fall Term.... ■< Logic — Jevons; 

\ Anatomy, Human and Comparative — Lectures. 

( Plato, Apologia; 
Winter Term -< Rhetoric — Day; 

( Human Physiology — Lectures. 

( Plato, Gorgias; 
Spring Term. •] Philology — Whitney; 
( Geology — Dana. 



10 GO UB8E OF INSTR UCTION. 



SENIOR YEAR. ^ 

/ Intellectual Philosophy — Porter; 
Fall Term.... \ Evidences in Christianity— //(?/)/<jms; 

( History, Mediaeval and Modern — Swinton; 

(Butler's Analogy — {One half the term;) 



I 
Winter Term { 



^Esthetics — {One-half term;) 



I English Literature — Shaio; 
[.History of Civilization — Gidzot. 

i Moral Philosophy — Hopkins; 
Political Economy — Perry; 
History, Development of U. S. Constitution. 

Declamations, original essays, speeches, etc., each term of the 
course : as shown in the Scheme of Rhetorical Exercises. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

t Cicero — Chase and Stuart; 
Fall Term.... -] Inorganic Chemistry — Barker; 
{ French Grammar — Ploetz. 

( Virgil — Cham and Stuart; 
Winter Term \ Mineralogy — Lectures; 

i French, Napoleon and La Petit Robinson de Paris. 
Virgil — Chase and Stuart; 
Spring Term. \ Organic Chemistry — Lectures; 
French, Racine — Fasquelle. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

De Senectute — Chase and Stuart; 
Fall Term. ... \ Advanced Algebra — Loomis; 
German Grammar — Otto. 
I Livy — Chase and Stuart; 
Winter Term \ Geometry and Conic Sections — Loomis; 
( German Reader — Brians' Otto. 
( Horace — Chase and, Stuart; 
Spring Term. \ Trigonometry, Mensuration, Survejing — Loomis; 
' German, Faust. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

/ Logic — Jevons; 
Va\a. Tkr.vt.... •] Mechanics — Olmsted; 

( Anatomy, Human and Comparative — Lectures. 



COURSE OF IJSSTEUCTION. 



11 



I 
Winter Term { 



r Rhetoric — Day, 



Natural Philosophy — Olmsted; 
I Physiology — Lectures; 
(^Analytical Geometry and Calculus — Loomis; {optional.) 

{ Philology — Whitney; 
J Astronomy — 'Olmsted; 
I Geology — Dana; 
t Botany — Oray. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

( Intellectual Philosophy — Porter; 

-j Evidences of Christianit}^ — Hopkins; 

' Mediagval and Modern History — Sicinton. 

Butler's Analogy and Esthetics; 
English Literature — Taine; 
History of Civilization — Guizot. 

Moral Philosophy — Hopkins; 
Political Economy — Perry; 
{ History, Development of the U. S. Constitution. 

Themes, declamations, etc. , the same as in the classical course. 

Instruction is given in the above studies only at the time specified, 
and students are required to observe this order without omission or trans- 
position. 



Spring Term, 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term 



Spring Term. 



EXAMINATIONS. 



Examinations for regular promotion are required on the completion 
of every study ; and the pursiiance of a study during the whole or a part 
of a term will in no case entitle the student to class promotion loithout his 
having passed a satisfactory examination therein. 




COLLEGE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



OL^SSIOJ^L. 



JUNIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

i Latin Grammar — Harkmss; 
Fall Term. ..A Composition and Rhetoric — Hart; 
i Physical Geography— Hon ston; 

/ Latin Reader — HarknesH; 
"Winter Term •< Elementary Philosophy — Quackenbon; 
( Ancient History — Swinton. 

{ Latin Reader — Harkness; 
Spring Term. \ Arithmetic, completed — Rohinson; 
( Englisli Grammar — Sicinton,. 

MIDDLE PREPARATORY YEAR. 

( Caesar — Chase and Stuart; 
•] Greek Grammar — Crosby; 
i French, German or Algebra. 

Csesar — Chase and Stewart; 
Greek Lessons — Crosby; 
French, German or Algebra. 

Cicero — Chase and Stuart; 

An abasis — Crosby; 

French, German or Geometry. 

SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 

Cicero — Chase and, Stuart; 
Anabasis — Crosby; 
' Elementary Algebra- — Loomis. 

{Virgil — Chase and, Stuart; 
Anabasi s — Crosby; 
Higher Algebra (begun) — Loomis. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Spring Term. 



Virgil — Chase and Stuart; 
Greek Prose Composition; 
PI ane Geom ctry — Loomis. 





COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 


13 




SOIJiJl^TIFIO. 




JUNIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 


Fall Term.... 


i Latin Grammar — Ilarkness; 
-! Physical Qf^ogrd.^h.y— Houston; 
\ English Grammar — Siointon. 




Winter Term 


( Latin Reader — Ilarkness; 
I Ancient History — Svnnton. 
( Arithmetic — Robinson. 




Spring Term. 


( Latin Reader — Harkness; 
\ English Grammar — Swinton; 
( Arithmetic — Robinson; 

SENIOR PREPARATORY YEAR. 




Fall Term. . . . 


( Caesar — Cliase and Stuart; 

\ Composition and Rhetoric — Hart; 

( First Algebra — Loomis; 




Winter Term 


{ Causer— Chase a7id Stuart; 

■^ Elementary Philosophy — Quackenbos. 

i Second Algehra—Lootnis. 




Spring Term. 


( Cicero — Chase and Stiuirt; 
-j Botany— (?ra?/; 
( QeomeiYj—Looynis. 




B hetorical 


exercises as in Classical Course. 






ENGLISH STUDIES. 




Classes are formed each term in Arithmetic, Algebra and 


English 


Grammar. 






English preparatory Students will meet on Wednesday of the fourth, 
sixth, eighth and tenth weeks for elocutionary exercises. 


Rhetorical Exercises through the whole course, as shown 
orical scheme. 


in Rhet- 









THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, 




COURSE OF STUDY. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 




Professor Butler: 


Critical and Exegetical study of 




New Testament Grammar; 
Critical and Exegetical study of 


select portions of the Old 
Testament Scriptures. 




portions of the Gospels/ the 


ENGLISH COURSE: 




Acts and Epistles; 


Elementary Logic and Rhetoric; 




Translations of select passages 


Mental and Moral Philosophy; 




by the Class, and essays on va- 


Butler's Analogy; 




rious topics in Sacred Chron- 


Natural Sciences; 




ology, Geography and History ; 


English Literature. 




Hebrew Grammar; 






MIDDLE YEAE. | 




Professor Dunn : 


Justification by Faith ; 




Lectures on the Evidences of 


Sanctification. 




Christianitj^ and Systematic 


Professor Butler : 




Theology ; 


Bible Criticism and Interpre- 




Existence and Attributes of God ; 


tation; 




Authenticity and Inspiration of 


Canon of the Old and New 




the Bible; 


Testament ; 




Works and Government of God; 


Exegesis of select portions; 




Nature and Fall of Man; 


Whately's Logic and Rhetoric, 




Moral Agency; 


with Criticism of Written Ex- 




The Atonement: 


ercises and Themes; Lectures 




Repentance ; 


on the Laws of Thought, 




Regeneration; 


Habits of Study and Style. 




SENIOR YEAR. | 




Professor Dunn: 


Professor Copp: 




Systematic Theology, continued ; 


Ecclesiastical History ; 




Perseverance; 


History of the Ancient, Medi- 




The Resurrection ; 


aeval, and Modern Church, in- 




Pinal Judgment; 


cluding doctrines, conti'over- 




Future State of Rewards and 


sies, and laws of the Church. 




Punishments; 
The Sabbath; 


Professor James: 




Praycir ; 


Homiletics; 




The Minislry; 


Analysis of the sermon and dis- 




(,'hrislian Grdiuanccs; 


cussion of the principal parts; 




Pastoi-al 'i'lieoJogy; 


Wrilten Sermons from each 




Work of the Christian Minister 


member of the Class; 




in tlie J-*u!pit, Prayer-meeting, 


Criticism of the same by the 




Sabbath School, Revivals, 


l^rofessor. 




Missions, etc. 






1 



THEOLOGICAL BEFAllTMENT. 15 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

This Department is open to any person of Christian character, who 
wishes to take a theological course of study, and whose education 
qualifies him to pursue the course with profit. 

Candidates for admission are expected to be present on the first day 
of the Academic Year. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition is free to all in this department who are members in good 
standing in any evangelical denomination, and tuition is free to those in 
other departments of the College who are preparing for the work of the 
gospel ministry. 

AID. 

Pecuniary assistance is furnished to students who are preparing for 
the ministry and are needy, and, so far as practicable, opportunities for 
remunerative preaching are obtained for them. The means thus pro- 
vided, together with v/hat may be earned during the vacations, are 
usually sufficient to support the student through the year. 

LIBRARY. 

The College has a well selected library to which additions are fre- 
quently made. This is accessible to the students in theology, free of 
charge. The Theological department has also a valuable library 
especially adapted to its wants, and with a fund for its constant increase. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

This course embraces all the studies of the regular course, except 
the Ancient Languages. A special coarse is allowed, under the direction 
of the Faculty, to those whose circumstances preclude them from the 
other courses. 

GRADUATION. 

A Diploma is given to those who complete either prescribed course 
of theological stud}^ and pass satisfactory examinations in the same. 
The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred on those who complete 
the regular course. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

These, in the Theological Department are the same as those in the 
College. See Calendar. 



COMMERCIAL & TELEGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

This Department is provided with excellent faciliti-ss for pursuing 
Commercial, Telegraphic, and Penmanship Courses. 

PREPARATION. 

A fair knowledge of the common English Branches is required to 
enter either the Commercial or Telegraphic Course. 

TIME TO ENTER. 

Students can enter this Department at any time. 
LENGTH OF TIME REQUIRED. 

The Commercial Course can, in some cases, be completed in three 
months, but most students should spend from four to live months in 
study and practice. Tlie Telegraphic Course requires from five to eight 
months. 

DIPLOMAS 
Are aw^arded to graduates. 

VACATION. 

There will be a vacation during the summer months corresponding 
to that of the College proper, but classes in this Department will not 
be interrupted by the short vacations between terms. 

TUITION, 

Payable in advance, at the Office of the Department, by purchase of 
Scholarships or Admission Cards. 

Scholarship for Commercial Course, giving the holder the privilege of complet- 
ing the Course at pleasure, and reviewing withoutchargc, including Business 

Penmanshij), no extra fees, $30 00 

Telegraphic Course, Theoretical and practical, (paper) 25 00 

Telegraphic Course, Theoretical and Practical, (soun J) 35 00 

Joint Commercial and Telegraphic Scholarship, (paper) 45 00 

Joint Commercial and Telegraphic Scholarship, (sound) 55 00 

Ladies admitted for the Commercial Course 25 00 

Ladies admitted for the Telegraphic Course, (paper) 20 00 

Ladies admitteil for the Tele^^raphic Course, (sound) .SO 00 

To Telegraphic Students, Business Penmanship during the entire course— oi.c 

hour per day, (extra) 8 00 

Telegraphic Book keeping, (extra) ., 5 00 

Both coml)incd, fextruj 10 00 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRArUIC. 17 



PENMANSHIP. 

Twenty Lessons, one hour eiich, $2 00 

E'orty Lessons, one hour each, 3 50 

SLKty Lessons (twelve wceksi one fcoiir each 5 00 

One Month, constant practice, (5 00 

Two Months, constant practice 10 00 

Ti achers' Course in Practical (time unlimited), 15 00 

Course in Ornamental 20 00 

Both Practical and Ornamental ' 80 00 

Commercial Course and Teachers' Course in Practical Penmanship, both Scholar- 
ships for unlimited time, 40 00 

Scholar!<hips are not transferable. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

For tlic Commercial Course, from $12 to $15. Telegraphic Course, 
from $2 to $2 50. 

All amounts received for Scholarships from residents of Hillsdale 
County will be devoted to the new building to be occupied b}^ this 
department. Those who attend the department now, will not only pay 
for tuition, but for a fine public building, at the same lime, with the 
same money that would pay for tuition alone, elsewhere. 

Persons not wishing to pursue a course of study in the department 
at present, but who intend to do so in a few j^ears, would do well to 
purchase scholarships now and thus aid in the construction of the beau- 
tiful group of buiklings in process of erection. 

THE COMMERCIAL COURSE, 

EMBRACES COMMERCIAL LAW, POLITICAL ECONOMY, BOOK-KEEPING, 
PENMANSHIP, AND COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC 

Book-keeping, as studied in connection witli the course, exhibits the 
entire process of opening, conducting and closing about forty sets of 
Stock and Partnership Books, with the most approved forms for keep, 
ing accounts by Single and Double Entry, in the various departments 
of trade. 

In working these sets the student makes out his Journal, — in most 
of the sets Day-book also, and posts to Ids Ledger, keeping all the 
auxiliary books, and writing out every kind of Commercial Paper, 
including Contracts, Promissory Notes, Checks, Drafts, Bills of Ex- 
change, Orders, Receipts, Due-bills, Accounts Current, Account Sales, 
Bills of Parcels, Invoices, and Bills of Lading. 

Among the kinds of business which the practice in Book-keeping 
comprises, are Wholesale and Retail Merchandising, Commission, Com- 
pound Company and Joint Stock business, Banking, Steamboating, 
Railroading, Manufacturing, Jobbing, Brokerage ,and Exchange. 

Instruction is given orally to classes and to individuals separately, 
and their work criticised and corrected. 

The Course is divided into three divisions, as follows: 



18 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPHIC, 



FIRST DIVISION. 



Daj'-book; 
Journal; 
Ledger ; 
Trial Balance; 
Analysis ; 



Commercial Paper; 

Commercial Arithmetic- Crittenden, 

Penmanship; 

Commercial Law — Parnons; 

Political Economy— Pe/7'^. 



SECOND DIVISION. 



Full Journal; I Changing Sets of Stock and Part" 

Cash Book; | nership Books from Double to 

Special Column Journal ; j Single Entry ; 

Commission Sales Book; | Shipments; 

Executors' and Administrators' | Commercial Paper; 



Accounts; 
Changing Sets of Stock Books from 

Single to Double Entry; 
Changing Sets of Partnership Books 

from Single to Double Entry; 



Consignments; 
Correspondence ; 
Commercial Law; 
Political Economy; 
Commercial Arithmetic: 
Penmanship. 



THIRD DIVISION, 



Compound Company Accounts, 

Half System; 
Compound Company Accounts, 

Whole System; 
Railroading; 
Steamboating; 
Banking; 



Brokerage ; 
Life Insurance; 
Fire Insurance; 
Penmanship ; 
Commercial Arithmetic: 
Political Economy; 
Commercial Law. 



TELEGRAPHY. 



Theoretical and Practical Telegraphy is taught by the Principal — a 
sound operator of years' experience, aided by practical assistants. 



FACILITIES. 

The telegraphic apparatus is very large, embracing every kind of 
instrument in use on the lines of this country, in connection with which 
there is a good collection of electrical instruments quite sufficient to 
fully illustrate every principle of electricity which would in any wise 
interest or bencjfit the student of Telegraphy. In the practice, students 
are drilled first on short circuits confined to the College building, then 
upon the College line having five separate offices, distant from each 
other a quarter of a mile, and provided with all necessary office supplies, 
such as blank record books, printed message blanks, tariff books, blank 
reports, and train order blanks. The W. U. ('o.'s city office and the 
tehigraph office of the L. 8. & M. .8. R. R. are also connected with this 
lin(!, and tlie telegrams of the public are received and transmitted from 



COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPHIC. 19 



either of these offices. As soon as the student becomes qualified to 
transact business for the public readily, he is allowed to take charge of 
the city office of the W. U. Telegraph Co., where he is required to per- 
form every duty connected with the public service, working directly 
with several cities am^ large towns, and being brought through this 
channel into business relations with a large body of operators, among 
whom are some of the best qualified in the service, he is enabled to gain 
a practical experience not attainable in any other way.- 

THE COURSE 

Is divided into two divisions, and is accompanied by a course of 
Lectures embracing the following subjects: 

Frictional Electricity, Galvanic or Voltaic Electricity, Magnetism, 
Systems of Telegraphy, Thermal Electricity, Insulation, Circuits, Con- 
duction, Induction, ^-Erial Telegraph, Submarine Telegraph, Terrestrial 
Electrical Disturbances. 

FIRST DIVISION. 



Elementary Chemistry — Wells; 

Messages ; 

Checking; 

Penmanship. 



Instruments ; 
Writing (Telegraphic); 
Receiving; 

Outline of Theoretical Telegraphy 
— Pond; 

SECOND DIVISION. 

Transmitting; I History and Theory of Telegraph — 

Receiving; , | Prescott; 

Book-keeping (Telegraphic) ; Railroad Business ; 

I Penmanship. 

The Department will soon have completed a subscription of ten 
thousand dollars for the construction of the north-west building, as 
shown in the plan of the new College group. When completed, this 
building will be a more elegant and commodious home than is possessed 
by any similar school in the West. The friends of commercial educa- 
tion are earnestly solicited to aid in this first structure of the kind in the 
United States, built by the business public. 

For additional information concerning this Department, address 

ALEXANDER C. RIDEOUT, Principal. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



TUITION— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

(Dr. Strceter'8 System :)- 



For Piano, Origan, Harmony, or Voice Building. 

Ten Weeks, twenty lessons , . 

Ten Weeks, ten lessons 

For Elementary or Advanced Singing Class, Five Weeks, tweuty lessons. 

INFOKMATIOK 



$12 00 
G 50 
1 00 



A fine suite of rooms, in the buildint:^ now erecting, will "Ik; devoted 
to the use of this department. 

In the Instrumental Department, it is the chief aim to lay a sure 
foundation, by a patient study of technics, and to develop a pure taste. 

Classes in vocal music will be graded to give thorough instruction 
in the principles of notation, and to afford means for acquiring consid- 
erable ability in reading at sight. 

The Beethoven Society affords opportunity for advanced singers 
to become familiar with the various styles of choir and chorus singing, 
and for an acqtuiintance with many compositions of the best masters. 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



During the past year " Free Hand Drawing and Perspective " have 
been tatight and made a requirement to students entering the Freshman 
Class. In the East Building, now being erected, a suite of fine rooms 
is set apart for this Department. These rooms are located and lighted 
with a view to their especial use. A nucleus of original paintings is 
already in exi.stencc by the liberality of friends. A supply of casts is 
very much needed and it is hoped will soon be added. 

Art-study from nature and original works is largely pursued, and 
it is the aim to make this Department second to none in this country. 

An endowment lor this Department is much needed and it is hoped 
that the especial friends of Art will come forward and supply this 
want. If competent instructors are retained it is necessary that this 
branch of the Institution shall be self-sustaining. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 
li.LSDALE, the scat of Hillsdale College is a tiourishing city in 



^^ Southern Michigan. By means of the Lake Sliore & Michigan 
Southern, and the Detroit, Hillsdale & Southwestern Railroads, which 
pass through it, communication is had with all parts of the country. 
By these routes it is one hundred and eighty miles east of Chicago, sixty 
west of Toledo, and eighty southwest of Detroit. The College buildings, 
located on College Hill, beautifully overlook the entire business portion 
of the city, and yet are sufficiently removed to secure quiet. 

BUILDINGS. 

The College occupies four separate buildings, three of them new, 
having been erected since the burning of the former edifice, March (Ith, 
1874. The structures are all of brick, tliree stories high, and are 
arranged on three sides of a quadrangle, the principal front facing the 
south. The College park of twenty-five acres, is well laid out and 
beautifully adorned with shade trees and evergreens. 

The main College Hall, 80 x 80, contains the Chapel, 60 x 06, 
I Library and Reading Room, 60 x HO, President's Room, Treasurer's 

I Office, four classical, and two mathematical recitation rooms. The 

I building is of Composite style of ai-chitect^ii-e, and is surmounted by a 
I dome containing a 2,500 lb. bell, and a large four dial tower clock. The 

I turret deck above the dome, (accessible to visitors,) rises 125 feet over 
i the foundation, and commands, the finest view in Southern Michigan. 
I The extreme West Building, 48 x 72, contains the Museum of Nat- 

I ural History, 48x80 — two stories; the Chemistry Amphitheatre; two 
fire-proof Chemical Laboratories; the Alumni Hall; and tliree large and 
elegantly furnished Literary Society Halls. 

The extreme East Building, 48 x 72, contains the Philosophical 
I Amphitheatre; the Lady Principars Recitation Room; one Mathematical 

! Recitation Room; Art Gallery; Studio; Music Room; Beethoven Hall ; 

I and two Ladies' Society Halls. 

I The Ladies' Dormitory Building, 80 x 60, is the "East Hall and 

I Connection" of the former building, (the centre and west wing of which 

1 were burned.) It contains the College Parlor; Lady Principal's Office 
j and Rooms; Dormitories for fifty young ladies; the Dining Hall, 
j Kitchen, etc. 

I The Northwest Building, 50x72 feet, which is to be built the 

} present year, will contain the Recitation Rooms and offices of the Com-^ 



23 GENERAL INFORMATION. 



mercial and Telegraphic Department, including a Lecture Room 80 x 50, 
a Practice and Apparatus Room; a large Writing Hall; a Battery Room; 
Offices, and twenty-two suits of Gentlemen's Dormitories, each suit 
consisting of a Parlo/about 12 feet square, and a Bed-room 9x12. 

The five buildings extend from North to South 192 feet; and from 
East to West 496 feet, and contain fifty per cent, more room than the 
former buildings. All the rooms and halls are lighted by gas, and 
warmed and ventilated in the most approved manner. 

For any additional information with regard to the design, history and 
photographic view, of the new College group, reference is made to the 
circular issued by authority of the Trustees, and to be obtained of the 
College Treasurer. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition may he obtained by the purchase or rental of Schn'arships. For 
$100 each, Perpetual Schol 'r.-hips can be secured ; but they may be 

rented, ptn- annum, from $5 00 to $fi 00 

Riiom rent, per term, from 8 00 to 5 00 

Matricu ati<m... , 8 00 

Incidental expn^ees, per term, from 2 00 to 3 00 

Board per we k, from 2 00 to 2 50 

The rejular <xpense-< for the Academic year, will or Unariiy be fr.jra. . . 120 ) to 1.50 00 

EXTRA CHARGES AS FOLl-OWS : 

Use of Musical Instrument, per term $3 00 

Penmanship, for twenty lessons 2 ()0 

Advanced Drawing', f r twenty lesson- 6 00 

Oil Painting, for twenty lessons 12 00 

Tuition, room rent, and incidentals, payable a term in advance. 
Board payable monthly. 

Students desiring to support themselves in whole or in part, can find 
employment in Hillsdale or its immediate vicinit}'. 

BOARDING. 

The College boarding hall for ladies and gentlemen is maintained on 
the co-operative system; table board from $2 00 to $2 25 per week. 

Ladies' dormitories only are connected :it tliv! present time with the 
College buildings. 

The rooms are furnished with stoves, bedsteads, tables and chairs. 
Each student furnishes her own bed and bedding, light, wood, etc. 

Students whose circumstances require it, are permitted to board 
themselves. 

Ladies who are not resUlenU of the city aro re(iu,ire(l to room in the 
College unleHH 'ptrmiadon from the Lady Principal ha,s been predouHbj oJ)- 
taiaed to room elnewhere. Entering students will bear this rule in mind 
before securing rooms in town. 

(JRADl'ATION. 

To all Classical Graduates, in full and regular standing, the Trustees 
grant r)i|)lf)ma,s conferring the a(;a(l(^mic degree of jjaclielor of Arts. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 28 



To all Scientific Graduates, the Trustees grant Diplomas conferring 
the academic degree of Bachelor of Science. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 
All Students are required to attend Prayers daily in the Chapel, and 
public worship on the Sabbath, at the College Church, or at such places 
as may be selected, with the approval of the Faculty. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

The Library contains about five thousand volumes, and is constantly 
increasing, by donation and purchase. All students have access to the 
Library, which will be open daily. Friends of the College will confer 
a substantial favor by making contributions of books. A Reading 
Room is connected with the Library, furnished with a valuable selection 
of periodicals, to which all have access. Nearly five hundred books 
from the valuable private library of Rev. Geo. T. Day, D. D., late 
Editor of the Morning Star, have just been added, to the College Library 
by the generous joint bestowment of Mrs. Geo. T. Day and Mr. L. W. 
Anthony, of Providence, R. I., to be known as the " Day Library." 

MUSEUM AND LABORATORIES. 

By the burning of the College Museum, the Natural History 
Collections were totally destroyed. But the generous and valuable con- 
tributions of other Colleges, the A.lumni, and Friends have already 
made more than a beginning in the work of restoration. 

While some valuable mineral specimens were lost that will not soon 
be replaced, yet the new collection is already more complete in certain 
departments than before the fire. Acknowldgement is given for the 

(1) Baggerly collection of Minerals. 

(2) Wabash College contribution. 

(3) Prof. Dawson's donation, Montreal. 

(4) K most valuable collection from Brown University, by Prof. 
J. W. P. Jenks. 

(5) Valuable collections from friends of the College, in India. 

(6) Tuttle and Harwood collection, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

(7) J. T. Ward, collection of Minerals. 

(8) Repeated contributions from Dr. E. K. Abbott, of California. 

(9) Suit of ores and rocks from the Upper Peninsular of Michigan. 

(10) General collection from Northern New Hampshire and White 
Mountains. 

(11) xV collection of Alpine and European Plants, (named and clas- 
sified at the British Museum.) 

(12) A collection of India Plants. 

(13) A collection of New England Plants. 

(14) A general collection of Michigan Plants. 

(15) Collection of Iron Ores and Furnace Products, by Mr. J. X 
Weitz. 



24 GENERAL INFOliMATlON. 



The Department has also added a series of one hundred colored 
anatomical charts, and also a suit of ten geol{)/:;ical paintings illuslrative 
of the difl'eient geological ages, painted for the College by Prof. Geo. B. 
Gardner, which are of tlie highest artistic and scientific value. A new 
and powerful microscope, n'.ade by ]j]0^\ning, of Lcndcn, has been 
presented to the department the present year. 

The department of Chemistry, though it lost all by the fire, is now 
more fully equipped in chemicals and apparatus, and possesses more 
varied and convenient applianc( s for its work than befoie the fire. 

LITERAEY SOCIETIES. 

The Gentlemen liave three well sustained Literary Societies: The 
Amphictyon, the Alpha Kappa Phi, and the Theological. 

The latter is mostly composed of students who have the ministry in 
view^ 

The Ladies have two Societies: The Ladies' Literary L'uion, and 
the Germanae Sodales, which are also well sustained. 

These Societies have separate rooms. 

ALUIMNI CATALOGUE. 

The Alumni Association publish this year a complete list of their 
membership, which includes all wiio have graduated from the College, 
giving their degrees, place of nativity, present address, occupation, etc. 
This Catalogue will be equivalent to the " College Triennial," and con- 
tain the Constitution of the Association, an abstract of the proceedings 
since its organization, the necrology of members, an account of the 
Literary Exercises of their Reunion, etc. 

This initiatory volume has been compiled by Elon G. Reynolds, A.M., 
a resident graduate, and is the result of a careful and patient gathering 
of such facts as will be of peculiar interest to all the members of the 
Association, and of great value to the Colleg(\ 

Extra copies may be obtained upon application lo the Alumni 
Professor, Rev. John S. Copp. Single copies, 25 cents, five coi^ies, %\. 



OUR CATALOGUE. 



Because of the reduction of our lesources since the destructive 
fire of 1874, and because of increased expenses, we have found it 
difiievdt to iRsiie our Annual Catalo/^ue. VV(! have, therefore, issued 
a smaller edition iind supplemented with this circular to save expense 
both in publishing and in postnge. *Iu ordering the Catalogue cost and 
pfjstage will be acceplahh;. 



UNIVERSrTY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 105628538